After Less than Two Years at Trans States, Pilot Achieves Career Goal of Flying for American Airlines

 

Marlon-Choyce
Captain Qualified First Officer Marlon Choyce

At Trans States, pilots are going to get the experience they need to move on to a major carrier.  Our training program is second to none, and we produce pilots that major airlines want to hire.  One of the most recent Trans States pilots to move on to the majors was Captain Qualified First Officer (CQFO) Marlon Choyce. Marlon’s ultimate career goal has always been to be an American Airlines pilot, and he achieved that goal after less than two years at Trans States.  Marlon credits the Trans States CQFO program with getting him the Pilot in Command time he needed to be hired by American.

The Pilot in Command, or PIC, is the crew member ultimately held responsible for the safety of a flight. The number of hours that a pilot acts in the role of Pilot in Command is called PIC time. The more PIC time that a pilot has, the better their chances of being offered a position with a major carrier.  Only a Captain can accumulate PIC time, which is why upgrade time is so important to First Officers.

First Officers facing long upgrade times often find themselves between a rock and a hard place.  As First Officers, they’re unable to accumulate the PIC time that they need to move on, but starting over with another airline with a shorter upgrade time means walking away from any accrued seniority.

Two years ago, Marlon found himself in just such a situation.  He’d been a First Officer with another regional airline for four years, and was looking at another two to three years before he could upgrade—even though he met the qualifications to fly as a Captain.  But with four years of accumulated seniority, he was understandably hesitant to start over with another airline.  However, when he heard about the Trans States CQFO program, he realized that starting over could be the right decision for his career.

The CQFO program allows pilots who meet Captain requirements to fly as either a Captain or a First Officer, depending on the airline’s scheduling needs.  As a Captain-qualified pilot, Marlon could start earning PIC time at Trans States immediately, which would bring him closer to his goal of flying for American.

Ultimately, Marlon made the decision to leave, and it paid off.  At Trans States, he earned PIC time during his very first trip out of training, and went on to earn a total of 135 PIC hours during just over 18 months.  “I earned no PIC time at my previous regional,” Marlon recalls. “At Trans States, I earned 135 hours in less than half the total time that I spent at my previous airline.”

While gaining PIC time was the deciding factor in Marlon’s career move, the decision to leave also made sense financially.  Even as a first year CQFO, Marlon earned more than he was earning with four years of seniority at his former employer (CQFOs earn $50.82 per flight hour when flying as a First Officer and $64.74 per flight hour when flying as a Captain).

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Flying as a Captain also provides leadership experience, which is important to mainline airlines.  “Mainlines are looking for pilots who are both qualified and equipped for leadership roles,” he explained.  “At Trans States, I was able to perfect my skills and hone knowledge twofold.  No matter where I was, I always had to be ready to fly in the left seat.”

To pilots who are preparing for mainline interviews, Marlon offers this piece of advice.  “I found that being organized and presenting yourself appropriately in customer service situations resonated with people.  As a result, I’ve learned first-hand that the major airlines look for signs of those good habits in their own pilot hire candidates.”

If you’re a pilot in the same situation that Marlon once found himself—Captain-qualified, but unable to upgrade, the Trans States CQFO program will get you the experience you need to advance your career.  Marlon is unequivocal in his endorsement of the program, and urges any pilot who finds themselves in such a situation to consider it.

“I would absolutely recommend the CQFO program to anyone.”

To learn more about the Trans States CQFO program, please click here.

Trans States Mechanic Helps Save a Life in Midair

Mike-Russell
STL hangar mechanic Mike Russell

Prior to his career as a Trans States A & P mechanic, Mike Russell was an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) in New York City for over two decades.  Mike’s job at Trans States comes with American Airlines travel benefits, which he recently used to fly to Kingston, Jamaica to visit family.  Little did he know that during the trip, he would need to put his EMT training to work to help save a life in midair.

During the first leg of his trip, a flight from St. Louis to Miami, a passenger began experiencing shortness of breath, as well as other symptoms of a potentially serious medical condition.  When a flight attendant asked if any of the passengers had medical training, Mike and a doctor on board jumped into action.  Mike assisted the doctor in caring for the passenger until the flight could divert to Atlanta and the passenger could receive medical attention on the ground.

American Airlines was very impressed with Mike’s selfless actions, and sent him the below note of appreciation, as well as a voucher for future travel.

Dear Mr. Russell:

Please accept our company’s formal “Thank You” for the assistance you provided aboard your recent flight. We are all grateful that you were on board and freely offered your medical expertise when it was needed most. Without a doubt, you greatly improved a difficult situation.

As an expression of our appreciation for volunteering your time and experience, we’ve made arrangements for an eVoucher for you to use toward the purchase of a ticket to travel with us. I realize your offer of assistance was not motivated by any potential reward. Nevertheless, we wanted you to know how much your efforts were appreciated.

Whether it’s in our hangar or in the air, Mike can always be counted on to put others first.  We’re proud that he’s part of our team.

Trans States Provides Simulated Flight Experience for Children with Autism

Recently some of our Raleigh-based crew members had the opportunity to be a part of a very special event co-sponsored by American Airlines and the Autism Society of North Carolina.  The event simulated the airport experience for children with autism so that they would know what to expect the first time they boarded a commercial flight.  The children also had the opportunity to board a Trans States Embraer 145, and were shown exactly what would happen during the first 20 minutes of a real flight.

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Captain Jonathan Jones, who was in the cockpit during the simulated flight experience, believes that the experience was a great way to acclimate autistic children to the airport environment before actually taking a flight.  “Often times, environments like airports can be overwhelming for families touched by autism,” he remarked.  “This means that families are putting their expenses at risk if they have to cancel travel plans due if their children become affected by the airport setting.”

The simulation exposed the children to just about every aspect of catching a flight, with the exception of taking off.  The children and their families checked in with a gate agent at the ticket counter and checked their bags. After going through security, they headed to the gate area, where Captain Jones, as well as First Officer Will Browne, and Flight Attendants Amy Furlough and Misty Burmingham, spent the afternoon making them feel comfortable, even showing them pictures of what the inside of the aircraft would look like.  The children then boarded the aircraft via a jetbridge.  During the boarding process, the children were given gift bags to commemorate the experience, including their very own wings, just like our crew members wear.

After the children and their families were settled with their seatbelts fastened, the flight “took off” by pushing back from the gate and taxiing for about 20 minutes to a remote parking spot.  Before the flight “descended” and returned to the terminal, there was even a beverage service.

Captain Jones said that organizers deemed the event a complete success, and the kids loved it, especially receiving the gift bags with the wings inside.  “That really made their day,” he added.  Captain Jones went on to remark on the importance of giving back to the communities we serve.  “Our passengers are our neighbors. Events like this give us an opportunity to back to our them, and to actively contribute to our community.”

Thank you to American Airlines and the Autism Society of North Carolina for giving us the opportunity to participate in such a worthy event!